themomerath:

Can we talk about how on point this tweet is

themomerath:

Can we talk about how on point this tweet is

(via straightwhiteboystexting)

vampmissedith:

When I was a freshman, my sister was in eighth grade. There was a boy in two of her periods who would ask her out every single day. (Third and seventh period, if I remember correctly.) All day during third and seventh she would repeatedly tell him no. She didn’t beat around the bush, she didn’t lie and say she was taken—she just said no.

One day, in third period, after being rejected several times, he said; “I have a gun in my locker. If you don’t say yes, I am going to shoot you in seventh.”

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Anonymous said: what's extreme is people like you not realizing that sometimes diversity can go too far. When characters are made black or disabled or gay for no reason it hurts the story and it hurts the cause of the people who are supposedly being represented.

mslorelei:

The ultimate answer to a white cis het able-bodied person whining about “diversity going too far”. White is the unmarked state.

summercomfort:

blue-author:

I like how you sent me an ask claiming that no one says a thing except people rhetorically making fun of the position that no one actually holds, and then you send me an ask clarifying that you hold exactly the same position.

I’m kind tempted to just not address anything else you said and just marvel in the perfection of that.

What’s the reason for making a character white? What’s the reason for making a character straight? What’s the reason for making a character abled or neurotypical or cis?

When you assume that making a character Other relative to yourself weakens the narrative, you’re revealing a terrible thing about yourself: that you can’t imagine that those people have backstories and inner lives the way that you do.

Every single person in a fictional narrative is ultimately there because a writer decided they needed to be there, but when the person looks like you and matches your expectations, you accept that this person who was made up for the plot had a life full of events that led them to the point where they’re appearing on the screen or page.

But when your expectations aren’t met, you start saying it’s forced. You can’t accept that events led them here because you don’t grant them the kind of life that you know you have. Your empathy does not extend to them. 

Look at how many white people think they can relate to a little girl in an industrial orphanage who falls in with a capitalist robber baron during the Great Depression more than they can relate to a little girl in the foster system in modern New York who falls in with a career politician, all because of a difference of race. The original Annie’s situation and world were only slightly less alien to us than the Victorian period, but making her white somehow makes her relatable in a way that a little girl who clearly exists in our world isn’t.

The fact is, empathy is linked to imagination and we can (and do!) relate to people who are literally alien beings in literally alien worlds. The choice not to relate to Quvenzhané Wallis as Annie—or a Black or gay or female or trans video game character—is a choice to shut off both imagination and empathy. 

The failing is not with the narrative, it’s with you.

Love the 4th parag, especially

fyomnomnom:

Pumpkin-coconut soup by Dmytrenko on Flickr.
"If you blame Native American communities for their poverty, remember that the entire continent was stolen from them.

If you blame Black American communities for their relative poverty, remember that Black Americans were stolen from a continent, trafficked, and enslaved for nearly 300 years.

Tell me again about how your family ‘started from nothing’ when they immigrated. Didn’t they start from whiteness? Seems like a pretty good start.

The American Dream required dual genocides, but tell me again about fairness and equal opportunity. Tell me about democracy, modeled after the Iroquois Confederacy. Tell me your proud heritage, and I will show you the violence that made it so."

Kim Katrin Crosby, Keynote Speaker for LGBTQ History Month at Dartmouth (30 September 2013)

(Source: biggreenmicroaggressions, via sinidentidades)

maggiemunkee:

ursulavernon:

Sooooo…not to be graphic, but I would walk into this room and get my period INSTANTLY. It’s like the interior decor version of white jeans.

*nod* i would cough my diva cup right out, just standing in the doorway.

maggiemunkee:

ursulavernon:

Sooooo…not to be graphic, but I would walk into this room and get my period INSTANTLY. It’s like the interior decor version of white jeans.

*nod* i would cough my diva cup right out, just standing in the doorway.

(Source: smallrooms, via living400lbs)

bemusedlybespectacled:

so I made a thing

bemusedlybespectacled:

so I made a thing

(via living400lbs)

touchmeordont:

kohenari:


Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.
How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?
Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.
Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

touchmeordont:

kohenari:

Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.

How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?

Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.

Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

(via nayyirahwaheed)

wilwheaton:

beerburritowhiskey:

This could be interesting, and a big win for both Colbert and CBS…if it happens.

Please god no this would be such a waste of everything Colbert does.  I love Letterman, and I love Late Night, but what Colbert does on his own show is so much more important than telling jokes and interviewing celebrities.

(Source: popculturebrain)